Koi History ~ Myths & Mysteries

by
Ray Jordan ©2006

Carp in Niigata: Breeding for Color Continues

Glossary:
aka, beni, hi = different shades of red
sumi = black
shiro = white
ki - yellow
motoguro= black spots at the base of pectoral fins

In 1917 a Niigata koi farmer, Elizaburo Hoshino, bred a special male kohaku with a female Ai Goromo which had just a few spots of sumi netting. This produced the 1st Taisho sanke sanshoku (modern type).

About the same time, Ki bekkos were bred with magoi to produce the first Ki Utsuri.

 

Finally Hi and/or Ki Utsuri and Kohaku or White-ish Kawarigoi with red spots were bred by Jukichi Hoshino (Shiro-bei). He produced the first "original style" Showa that looked somewhat like Hi/Ki utsuri in the early 20th century. These early showas had goshiki-like (grayish) shiro and striped fins.




The next change was accomplished by breeding showa to asagi, which helped produce motoguro marked fins. In 1964 Tomiji Kobayashi crossed a Male Yogozen Kohaku with a female showa to produce a new style showa with a large dorsal crimson red pattern. It also had a brighter white ground without netting, deep wrapping sumi that formed motoguro, and a zigzag pattern on the head.

Jukichi Hoshino (Shiro-bei) produced the first "original style" Showa that looked somewhat like Hi/Ki utsuri in the early 20th century. These early showas had goshiki like (grayish) shiro and striped fins. Next change was accomplished by breeding to asagi which helped produce motoguro marked fins.

In 1964 Tomiji Kobayashi crossed a Male Yogozen Kohaku with a female showa to produce a new style showa with a large dorsal crimson red pattern. It also had a brighter white ground without netting, deep wrapping sumi that forms motoguro, and a zigzag pattern on head.






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